Insurance Claim Jargon — More Terms Explained

In my last blog, I explained a few insurance claim terms that might baffle you. At Allied Claims, we do our best to make it straightforward, but other insurance professionals, such as a Loss Adjuster, may not realise you don’t understand what they’re talking about.
Business Interruption
When business productivity is stopped by an unplanned event or disaster, affecting the company’s profits.
insurance-claim-business-interruptionIf your business has to temporarily stop trading, for instance during repairs following a fire or flood at your premises, a Business Interruption Clause can be activated. Your insurance claim under this clause will normally cover loss of income, and also loss of certain overheads over a specified period of time.
This isn’t always as simple as it sounds, since the insurance company’s Loss Adjuster may not be using the same definitions of costs and overheads as your accountant. Because of this, we’d recommend that you consult both an accountant and an Insurance Broker when determining your level of cover for Business Interruption.
Getting the right level of Business Interruption cover could mean the difference between your business surviving or going under after a disaster. It’s estimated that at least 70% of businesses that suffer a catastrophic insurance claim fold within two years, either because they have insufficient or inappropriate Business Interruption cover, or because they have none at all.
Claims and Underwriting Exchange
A computerised register of information from insurance proposals, claims and renewal forms, shared by insurers as part of their campaign against fraud.
insurance-claim-underwritingMost people don’t realise that every insurance claim made is recorded in full, whether or not it’s successful. If you have to complete an insurance application form, you’ll find they want to know whether you’ve made a claim in the past three or five years.
False information given here, such as saying you haven’t made a claim within that time when actually you have, could result in a future claim being refused, even many years later.
Co-insurance
An arrangement by which an insurance policy is shared by more than one Insurer.
reinsurance-insurance-claimYour Insurer may, in certain circumstances, choose to spread the risk by reinsuring part of your policy with one or more other insurers. This doesn’t really affect you as the Policy Holder, since you’ll only deal with the Insurer you negotiated the policy with, but it’s as well to be aware of how any insurance policy is working.
If you need any help with your insurance claim, ring us on 0800 999 5679 or go to the Contact@ section of the website by following this link >>>